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This blog is dedicated to sharing the best of elephant photography along with interesting information, conservation efforts and news stories.

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Disclaimer

This blog shares the images we come across on the internet as both a fan of the photographer’s work and as animal lovers with a passion for pachyderms. All images found on this blog remain the property of their respective owners. We lay no claim to any image featured here and receive no financial benefits from their use. We ensure that all images are correctly attributed to their respective owners. If material you own is featured here and you would like it removed or credited differently, you can contact us at anelephantblog@gmail.com and expect a prompt response.

1 April 13
Photo by: RayMorris1

Photo by: RayMorris1

9 February 12
Photo by: lhl

Photo by: lhl

29 December 11
 
Orphaned elephants cover themselves in dust, turning themselves red. The orphans fling trunk-fulls of red earth over their bodies after enjoying a mud bath to protect their skin from insects and the sun. Environmental consultants Mick Baines, 63, and Maren Reichelt, 36, witnessed the sight in Tsavo East National Park in Kenya. The elephants are part of a herd of orphans being cared for at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust at Ithumba. The trust rehabilitates the elephants, many of which have gone through traumatic events at the hands of humans, before releasing them back into the wild.
Picture: Specialist Stock / Barcroft Media

Orphaned elephants cover themselves in dust, turning themselves red. The orphans fling trunk-fulls of red earth over their bodies after enjoying a mud bath to protect their skin from insects and the sun. Environmental consultants Mick Baines, 63, and Maren Reichelt, 36, witnessed the sight in Tsavo East National Park in Kenya. The elephants are part of a herd of orphans being cared for at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust at Ithumba. The trust rehabilitates the elephants, many of which have gone through traumatic events at the hands of humans, before releasing them back into the wild.

Picture: Specialist Stock / Barcroft Media

27 December 11

4 days old…

Photo by: njwight

4 days old…

Photo by: njwight

Reblogged: njwight

21 December 11
Photo by: plαdys

Photo by: plαdys

6 December 11
Photot by: Clepsydrée

Photot by: Clepsydrée

2 November 11
Photo by: Cennydd

Photo by: Cennydd

30 October 11
Photo by: fwooper

Photo by: fwooper

27 October 11
Photo by: kimvanderwaal

Photo by: kimvanderwaal

26 October 11
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh